Last Night’s Third and Final 2008 Presidential Debate: Environment Highlights

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Last Night’s Third and Final 2008 Presidential Debate: Environment Highlights

Debate Obama McCain

Last night marked the third and final Presidential debate between candidates John McCain and Barack Obama at Hofstra University in Hempstead, New York. This event felt much more like a debate than their previous showdowns, in which they often responded only to the moderator’s questions and not to each other. Last night, this changed, and allowed for direct questions, and in some case accusations, to come out. The most important topics of the night were mostly overshadowed by “Joe the plumber”, and he-said, he-said type games, but the candidates did manage to address the energy crunch yet again, and re-solidify their positions. Obama stuck with his 10 year goal to eliminate our dependence on foreign oil, while McCain responded with the clearly uncertain “seven, eight, ten years”. Yet again, CNN polls show that over 58% of viewers selected Senator Obama as the debate leader, which means that McCain didn’t find the “game-changer” he needed last night. Keep reading to see all of the excerpts from last night’s debate that deal with energy and the environment, and check back in the coming weeks for another 2008 Presidential Race recap.

 

Obama: If we invest in a serious energy policy, that will save in the amount of money we’re borrowing from China to send to Saudi Arabia.

McCain: Energy — well, first — second of all, energy independence. We have to have nuclear power. We have to stop sending $700 billion a year to countries that don’t like us very much. It’s wind, tide, solar, natural gas, nuclear, off-shore drilling, which Sen. Obama has opposed. [Obama opposed in the past, but now is in support of as part of a larger, more comprehensive energy plan - Ian]

Obama: So the fact of the matter is that if I occasionally have mistaken your policies for George Bush’s policies, it’s because on the core economic issues that matter to the American people, on tax policy, on energy policy, on spending priorities, you have been a vigorous supporter of President Bush.

Moderator: Let’s go to — let’s go to a new topic. We’re running a little behind. Let’s talk about energy and climate control. Every president since Nixon has said what both of you have said, and, that is, we must reduce our dependence on foreign oil. When Nixon said it, we imported from 17 to 34 percent of our foreign oil. Now, we’re importing more than 60 percent. Would each of you give us a number, a specific number of how much you believe we can reduce our foreign oil imports during your first term?

McCain: I think we can, for all intents and purposes, eliminate our dependence on Middle Eastern oil and Venezuelan oil. Canadian oil is fine. By the way, when Sen. Obama said he would unilaterally renegotiate the North American Free Trade Agreement, the Canadians said, “Yes, and we’ll sell our oil to China.” You don’t tell countries you’re going to unilaterally renegotiate agreements with them. We can eliminate our dependence on foreign oil by building 45 new nuclear plants, power plants, right away. We can store and we can reprocess. Sen. Obama will tell you, in the — as the extreme environmentalists do, it has to be safe. Look, we’ve sailed Navy ships around the world for 60 years with nuclear power plants on them. We can store and reprocess spent nuclear fuel, Sen. Obama, no problem. So the point is with nuclear power, with wind, tide, solar, natural gas, with development of flex fuel, hybrid, clean coal technology, clean coal technology is key in the heartland of America that’s hurting rather badly. So I think we can easily, within seven, eight, ten years, if we put our minds to it, we can eliminate our dependence on the places in the world that harm our national security if we don’t achieve our independence.

Moderator: All right. Can we reduce our dependence on foreign oil and by how much in the first term, in four years?

Obama: I think that in ten years, we can reduce our dependence so that we no longer have to import oil from the Middle East or Venezuela. I think that’s about a realistic timeframe. And this is the most important issue that our future economy is going to face. Obviously, we’ve got an immediate crisis right now. But nothing is more important than us no longer borrowing $700 billion or more from China and sending it to Saudi Arabia. It’s mortgaging our children’s future. Now, from the start of this campaign, I’ve identified this as one of my top priorities and here is what I think we have to do.

Number one, we do need to expand domestic production and that means, for example, telling the oil companies the 68 million acres that they currently have leased that they’re not drilling, use them or lose them. And I think that we should look at offshore drilling and implement it in a way that allows us to get some additional oil. But understand, we only have three to four percent of the world’s oil reserves and we use 25 percent of the world’s oil, which means that we can’t drill our way out of the problem. That’s why I’ve focused on putting resources into solar, wind, biodiesel, geothermal. These have been priorities of mine since I got to the Senate, and it is absolutely critical that we develop a high fuel efficient car that’s built not in Japan and not in South Korea, but built here in the United States of America. We invented the auto industry and the fact that we have fallen so far behind is something that we have to work on.

Now I just want to make one last point because Sen. McCain mentioned NAFTA and the issue of trade and that actually bears on this issue. I believe in free trade. But I also believe that for far too long, certainly during the course of the Bush administration with the support of Sen. McCain, the attitude has been that any trade agreement is a good trade agreement. And NAFTA doesn’t have — did not have enforceable labor agreements and environmental agreements…And the point is that we become energy independent and we will create millions of jobs — millions of jobs in America.

We hope you’ve enjoyed following the debates as much as we have. Check back next week for updated environmental news on the Presidential race.

Click here to see our coverage of the First Debate

Click here to see our coverage of the Second Debate

Located in Toronto, Ontario, Ian is the co-founder of The Auto Future and managing editor. Add Ian to your Circles on Google+ or Follow on Twitter @iapa.