Should the government be more involved in furthering the green movement?

By  |  0 Comments
Should the government be more involved in furthering the green movement?

The debate over how much influence governments should have in everyday life has raged on for decades. But when it comes to environmental decisions and green-based lifestyles, a new study suggests Americans want their government to get involved.

Ozoshare, the first social network connecting the green world, has announced the findings of a commissioned study titled, “Government Involvement: Furthering the Green Movement”.

The results of the survey reveal perceptions from a cross-section of Americans (Republicans, Democrats and Independents) and how they see government’s role in furthering the green movement.

The data is based on a September 2012 electronic survey of U.S. residents across all 50 states.

Survey participants were asked to what extent the government should or should not promote green initiatives and what areas should receive the highest priority.

Key findings of the survey included the fact that more than 72% of respondents indicated that nationwide interest in the green movement is on the rise. 67% of respondents feel that government should be involved in furthering the green movement and 62.7% of respondents feel that the government has been more active in furthering the green movement over the past four years.

Meanwhile, PolitiFact has examined how the current Obama administration is doing so far environmentally. PolitiFact is a political fact-checking organization that monitors Congress, the White House, lobbyists and interest groups.

According to the group, the U.S. government has had both successes and failures when it comes to furthering the green movement. In terms of keeping green campaign promises, the current administration has succeeded in terms of raising fuel economy standards, establishing programs to convert manufacturing centers into clean technology leaders and requiring 10 percent of electricity to come from renewable energy by 2012.

Areas where the government has not met initial goals include the creation of a low carbon fuel standard, elimination of oil and gas tax loopholes and the establishment of Green Energy Corps to promote green energy in developing countries.


Madison is a journalist/media consultant currently working in Toronto.